E-Safety

eDiscovery: the issues facing law firms and solicitors

by Alan Batey

Information Security Consultant and Forensic Investigator

In today’s world, evidence in legal cases is sourced from the vast quantities of Electronically Stored Information (ESI) that exists across a range of platforms and devices. Acting on behalf of clients, large law firms may have access to eDiscovery platforms to sift, sort, redact and reduce the amount of data that is made available, keeping only those files with relevance to the case in a legally recognised format which preserves the integrity of the data and stands the ultimate test of court acceptance. Smaller firms may not have operated an eDiscovery platform, considering it too expensive or shying away from the complex technology. This is not altogether surprising.

ESI comes from a number of sources; from emails, texts, voicemails messages, word-processed documents and databases, including documents stored on portable devices such as memory sticks and mobile phones. In totality it includes an unfeasibly large and complex volume of files. SRM was recently involved in an eDiscovery case where the original ESI involved 1.2TB of data which, in this particular instance, was reduced to 160GB. Although hundreds of gigabytes is more usual, this is still more data than can effectively be processed in a legally acceptable manner without the use of sophisticated management and tools.

Yet many who engage with eDiscovery Platforms find the process is unsatisfactory. They may require assistance with the forensic discovery of electronic documents or need more support in managing the information security risks surrounding the placing of confidential information on a Cloud or server based platform. They may feel their technology partner is unsupportive or that the cost of the exercise lacks transparency. Ultimately, some are worried about the security issues of releasing sensitive information to a third party.

eDiscovery  projects require extremely high levels of skill, technical expertise and diligence. At SRM we work in conjunction with the legal team to advise and execute the eDiscovery requirement for their client. We define each stage and advise on the ongoing process and progress giving a full breakdown of costs for each stage. Our service is at the cutting edge of eDiscovery technology, saving the clients time and money while achieving best results. We also work effectively and strategically to ensure that disruption to the client’s business is minimal.

When such large volumes of data are made available to a third party, trust is crucial. Our eDiscovery  team includes individuals who have worked with the police, MOD and FTSE100 companies. We are the leading PCI Forensic Investigation company in the UK and cyber security supplier to HM Government.

SRM provides a range of highly professional cost-effective solutions, suitable for all sizes of law firms. From the provision of a low cost ‘E-Discovery Lite’ package to the involvement of Expert Witness Forensic Consultants or the use of a Virtual Chief Information Security Officer VCISOtm.

 

http://blog.srm-solutions.com/ediscovery-and-edisclosure-why-what-how-and-who/

https://www.srm-solutions.com/services/ediscovery-edisclosure/

Can Decision Cycles help us maintain the initiative in cyberspace?

As our world gets increasingly complex we must choose the levers we use to influence it with care. One way to look at this is through the lens of decision cycles.

For those not familiar with this concept, decision cycles are the cyclic process through which we perceive a stimulus, understand its implications, decide on a response and implement that decision. (There are a number of models and references). Simplistically, if we can make effective decisions quicker than our opponents, then we will, theoretically, hold the initiative.

The decision cycle lens is a useful one for those responsible for making decisions about cyber related issues as it throws any dangerous policies into harsh relief.

Most businesses work in a world where their policies, and here I’m talking about management intent rather than paperwork, refresh on a 12 month cycle based on standards which tend to refresh on a 5 year cycle. I note many will be smiling ruefully at this optimistic view!

In today’s information environment many of our risks are changing on a much smaller (faster) cycle, measured in days and weeks rather than months. Our operational tempo is defined not just by the speed of change, but by the way that the speed of change is accelerating.

This presents us with an exciting challenge; if we rely on static policy and processes – and many organisations still do – then we must expect our adversaries to outmanoeuvre us, and our risks to out evolve.

Where does this take us? Decision Cycle theory gives us a number of areas where we can hard wire agility into our business systems.
* Firstly, we can ensure that our warning, reporting, alarm and monitoring systems (Technical and Procedural) are tuned to report those events that most concern us.
* Secondly, we can ensure that we fully understand our own vulnerabilities and sensitivities, and the impact that adverse events will have on our operations. We can test and exercise those scenarios that most concern us. We can challenge our own assumptions. This will enable us to understand impacts and qualify outcomes more quickly.
* Thirdly, we do need to understand our own options, their limitations, and review these on a regular basis. This will enable us to make decisions more quickly.
* Finally, we need to ensure that our implementation of these decisions are well planned and where possible, practiced. We must also review effectiveness at every level and make changes that are required at any part of the cycle.

All of this would seem to be common sense… though is often not done in practice. There are many reasons for this, ranging from technical inertia to process stagnation. The important thing is that we acknowledge and track our challenges – then we can mitigate the changing risks.

If we are able to design agility into our business systems and processes, and if we tune our organisations so that we can take a proactive posture, then we can keep the initiative. The simple decision cycle model then gives us an easy way to challenge our posture on a regular basis to establish where and when change is required.

This is not rocket science, but many of us do seem to find it surprisingly hard. This simple model is one way of stepping forward and bringing effect to bear in our defence.

Managing Director of SRM, Tom F is a regular contributor to the SRM blog.

What is Red Team engagement?

By Andrew Linn, Principal Consultant

The news this year has been full of high profile hacks on large organisations. These have included viral and ransomware attacks which have brought associative notoriety to a number of mysterious hacking groups and their victims: Shadow Brokers captured US National Security Agency (NSA) tools in April while The Mr Smith hackers breached HBO’s security in August.

Of course, anyone reading the news knows these were not isolated incidents. Other notable attacks included WannaCry ransomware, various forms of Petya malware and Cloudbleed. With ingenuity, intelligence and malicious intent on their side, hacker groups use their collective skills to exploit any weaknesses in an organisation’s cyber defences. So how can an organisation defend itself from the bad guys? By working with the good guys through Red Team engagement.

To counteract the offensive strategies of gifted hackers, you need equally gifted counter-hackers. Red Teaming is not a penetration test; it is more of a philosophy which involves acting as a potential adversary. The Red Team focuses on the objective of the engagement and examines this from a number of different angles pulling together a plan of attack using a range of different techniques and abilities; testing procedural, social and physical components of security in addition to technical controls. Penetration testing techniques and skills form one aspect of Red Teaming but the service goes well beyond that; to the use of an adversarial mindset to determine strategy and policy making.

In practice, Red Team engagement involves working with ethical, skilled and experienced professionals who act like true hackers, simulating internal and external hacking attempts to test the response on a client’s system. With client permission, the Red Team seeks to break through the hardened perimeter, using the weakest identifiable point, to gain access to the organisation’s system. Using common hacking techniques they seek to gain a foothold; tunnelling traffic back through ports that are commonly open within a business, usually via the web, so they can communicate with their own servers on the outside without being detected. These benign servers are then used to control devices, which have either been placed or hacked, on the inside of the client’s organisation.

In addition to a rigorous examination of the organisation’s security controls, a Red Team engagement will exercise incident detection, response and management.  This can be linked to a wider incident simulation process testing procedures and response capability throughout the business.

Opening up an organisation’s entire network and allowing a third party to effectively breach security defences requires a high degree of trust. Experienced, highly qualified Red Teams are few and far between. At SRM our Red Team is comprised of ex-police High Tech Crime Unit officers, qualified ethical hackers and includes holders of the Offensive Security Certified Professionals (OSCP). At SRM OSCP training is part of our ongoing professional development programme.

 

Win a free day’s consultancy: October offer to celebrate National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM)

Security Risk Management is offering a free day’s consultancy in support of National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

October may, for many, be associated with the ghouls and ghosts of Halloween. But that is not all this month is about. It is also National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Like Halloween (in its current form) the NCSAM has its origins in the United States. Unlike Halloween, however, it focuses on keeping us safe from those who might wish to harm us.

In 2004 the US Department of Homeland Security and the National Cyber Security Alliance joined forces to create an initiative to educate and raise awareness of staying safe online. Its aim is to engage with and educate businesses, educational organisations and the public in how to build resilience and stay safe online. It is now recognised in the UK as an important way to remind everyone of the potential perils of cybercrime.

This year’s theme is ‘Our Shared Responsibility’ and this has relevance to the business community as well as the general public. Data breaches hit the headlines on a regular basis. Every time a company is exposed in this way it highlights the need for data security to be at the top of every board agenda. It cannot be the sole remit of the IT department or the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). Its importance is so great that it ought to appear on board agendas every month, even if a sub-group then manages the implementation of compliance and security.

From phishing attacks which exploit human psychology to gain access to an individual’s log in and account details, to large scale Black Hat attacks by highly-organised cyber criminals, company-wide awareness is crucial to protection and defence. Increasingly, boards are becoming aware of their collective responsibility to provide additional resource and support for their information security teams. Outside expertise is an important aspect of this, particularly when it comes to testing a company’s defences.

Rather than waiting for a malicious attack from an unprincipled attacker, it is important to make use of the skills of experienced information security test teams. The very best include individuals with the Offensive Security Chartered Practitioner (OSCP) qualification. Unlike their counterparts with only theoretical knowledge of hacking, those with OSCP training have practical skills. Their rigorous training includes the requirement to be able to effectively hack a range of well-protected networks within a challenging timeframe. Through this process they get into the minds of the hackers themselves.

Those boards that are seen to be proactive will help to make their organisation less appealing to hackers. Those who have engaged with the best test teams will make the actual task of breaching security sufficiently difficult that hackers will look for easier prey. So let October be the month in which every board of every company in the UK prioritises data security and recognises its shared responsibility.

To win a free day’s consultancy, just leave your details on the Contact Us page. The prize includes:

  • Development of the information security risk profile of your organisation delivered by an experienced Information Security Consultant;
  • A prioritised roadmap to help you focus on the issues to fix now and suggested mitigation steps to help you manage key risks;
  • Where your organisation ranks on the GDPR maturity scale and the next steps you should take to be prepared for May 2018;
  • A scan of your website to uncover any significant security risks using our best of breed scanning tool;
  • Preparation for Cyber Essentials and a discount on obtaining certification.

This prize is worth over £1000 and will provide you with comprehensive insight of your organisations Information Security risk profile.

PCI – Europe Community Meeting Barcelona 24 – 26 October 2017

James Hopper and Paul Brennecker of SRM will be attending the Europe Community Meeting in Barcelona 24th – 26th October. Organised by the Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council (PCI SCC) the focus of the three day event will be the security of payment card data. Those who are attending are invited to make appointments with James and Paul to discuss any specific issues they may have and receive free advice from two of the industry’s experts.

James Hopper

James is skilled at providing strategic insight into the management and implementation of business-wide information security solutions. He is a clear-thinking no-nonsense problem-solver with wide experience in both the corporate and SME markets.

James joined SRM in 2016 and brings extensive senior management experience from within the worlds of Consultancy and IT. Previously with a large FTSE 100 Outsourcing Company as a Managing Consultant and the Operations & Innovation Director for a large NHS Organisation, he has overseen the scoping and implementation of plans from the very small to extensive national projects. His experience also includes delivery of major IT Transformation Programmes and senior assurance roles.

Paul Brennecker

Paul is a PCI DSS compliance guru. He regularly speaks at PCI conferences and writes on issues relating to card payment security. He is also a practising senior Information Security Consultant at SRM. He is currently engaged with a number of high-profile organisations, assisting them with their compliance programmes. Ranging from programme management, and mobilisation of their PCI DSS compliance projects, Paul also advises clients on their information security policies, their implementation and training requirements. Paul has considerable skill at conducting pre-compliance scoping and de-scoping exercises, conducting gap analysis assessments, creating remediation plans and assisting with intrusion detection and prevention systems.

Paul joined SRM in March 2008 from Barclaycard. As their former PCI Compliance Manager, Paul successfully drove the compliance programme forward and worked closely with both VISA and MasterCard to raise awareness of the standard and was a regular key-note speaker at the industry’s security forums. Due to his substantial network of colleagues and industry contacts Paul is a well-known and highly respected consultant, recognised for his approachable manner and depth of knowledge.

Simply email james.hopper@srm-solutions.com or paul.brennecker@srm-solutions.com to make an appointment.